North Bingham Street

6 acres • $325,000

Property Owner:

Private non-farming landowner

Contact Name:

Beth Stanway

Property Location:

2137 North Bingham Street, Cornwall VT 05753
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The Land

Total number of acres available with this property:

6.3

Total acres available for agriculture:

5.0

Acres of forested land:

0.0

Acres of cropland or tillable land:

2.0

Acres of pasture:

3.0

Other open and/or non-farmable land:

There is a one bedroom home and a yurt on the property

Quality of land:

There are approximately two acres of Nellis soil on the property. Four of clay. The 700sf yurt has the potential to be a green house/processing facility for growing and adding value to vegetables. The Nellis soil would support fruit and nut trees. The rest of the area would be amenable to grazing livestock.

Farm Information

Water sources present:

Available

Water sources details:

Drilled well

Barns and sheds:

Available

Farmer housing:

Available

Farmer housing details:

There is currently a one bedroom year round house on the property

Equipment and machinery:

None available

Tenure Arrangement

Tenure arrangement:

Property for sale

Property for sale:

$325,000 for land, house and yurt. Owner financing possible with 20% down

Sale price:

$325,000

Additional Information

Simplify your life with this unique, lovingly built one bedroom contemporary home and studio on 6.3 acres on a corner lot in Cornwall. Combined, the studio and home are 1500 square feet. 

There are approximately two acres of Nellis soil on the property. Four of clay. The 700sf yurt has the potential to be a green house/processing facility for growing and adding value to vegetables. The Nellis soil would support fruit and nut trees. The rest of the area would be amenable to grazing livestock. 

Here’s the list of plants spotted in the pastures: Bluegrass, Quackgrass, Orchard Grass, Reed Canary Grass and Meadow Foxtail.  And a bit of legumes: Red Clover and Vetch.  Clovers and trefoil could be frost seeded (broadcast) in late winter to increase the % and improve stand diversity. Trefoil has no bloating risk and was once grown in abundance in the county.   Dandelion & Bedstraw (the one real weed, but who knows – the sheep might nibble on it).